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Canada Crop Reports
5/21 5:51 PM

OMAHA (DTN) -- The following are highlights from the weekly crop progress report for conditions as of May 15, released May 18 from Alberta Agriculture and Forestry, Economics and Competitiveness Division, Statistics and Data Development Branch.

In the first half of May, temperatures have been the warmest since 1961 in most parts of the province and most areas received less than 10 millimeters of moisture.

This has provided the ideal weather for quick ground thaw and allowed seeding operations to be in full swing across the province.

Provincially, as of May 15, about 38% of crops have been seeded, compared with the five-year average (2013 to 2017) of 60% and the long-term normal (2004 to 2017) of 68% by this time.

Producers are almost a week behind. Regionally, seeding progress is most advanced in the Southern Region at 54%, followed by the North West Region with 36%, Peace Region at 32% and the North East and Central Regions, both at 30%.

Soil moisture reserves are highly variable across the province. Although a large percentage of wet areas have dried, making seeding possible, there is still standing water in some areas across the province. Provincially, surface soil moisture is rated (sub-surface soil moisture ratings shown in brackets) at 3 (4)% poor, 18 (17)% fair, 42 (44)% good, 31 (31)% excellent, and 6 (4)% excessive.

Pasture and tame hay conditions improved from a week ago, due to warmer weather. However, the lack of moisture has caused a slow start to pasture and tame hay growth in some areas. Rain will soon be needed to improve pasture and tame hay conditions, as well as for the fall-seeded crops. Pasture conditions (tame hay conditions are in brackets) across the province are reported as 6 (5)% poor, 30 (32)% fair, 57 (56)% good and 7 (7)% excellent. Some of the fall-seeded crops have reported winterkill and will need to be reseeded. Provincially, fall-seeded crop conditions are rated as 3% poor, 22% fair, 66% good and 9% excellent.

REGIONAL ASSESSMENTS:

The 2018 Alberta Crop Report Series continues to provide summaries for the following five regions:

REGION ONE: SOUTHERN (STRATHMORE, LETHBRIDGE, MEDICINE HAT, FOREMOST)

-- Warm and mostly dry weather conditions over the past week have been favorable for seeding progress. While there are still some low fields with standing water, rain is still needed in some fields for even germination and spur pasture and hay growth. Overall, seeding is estimated at 54% completed, up 34% from a week ago, with about 8% of crops emerged.

-- About 54% of spring wheat, 53% of durum, 51% of barley, 51% of canola, 68% of dry peas, 56% of corn, 89% of sugar beets and 75% of potatoes have now been seeded.

-- Pasture and tame hay fields are in good condition, but more moisture is needed. Pasture conditions are rated as 13% poor, 15% fair, 64% good and 8% excellent, with similar ratings reported for tame hay.

-- Fall seeded crops conditions are reported as 1% poor, 15% fair, 68% good, and 16% excellent.

REGION TWO: CENTRAL (RIMBEY, AIRDRIE, CORONATION, OYEN)

-- Seeding is progressing well in the Region, with 30% now completed (up 26% from last week), despite some rain showers which slowed down seeding progress.

-- About 39% of spring wheat, 29% of durum wheat, 23% of barley, 21% of canola, 58% of dry peas and 36% of corn are reported as seeded. Also, 3% of crops have emerged.

-- Forages, pasture and hay fields are in good shape. Pasture conditions are now rated as 74% good to excellent (compared to 57% from a week ago) and 26% poor to fair (compared with 43% last week), with similar ratings reported for tame hay.

-- Regionally, fall-seeded crops are rated as 3% poor, 18% fair, 69% good, and 10% excellent.

REGION THREE: NORTH EAST (SMOKY LAKE, VERMILION, CAMROSE, PROVOST)

-- Warm and dry weather contributed to seeding progress at 30%, up 28% from a week ago. However, there are still parts of some fields with standing water. Surface and sub-surface soil moisture is rated at 10 and 9% excessive, respectively.

-- Nearly 40% of spring wheat, 11% of barley, 22% of canola and 83% of dry peas are reported as seeded.

-- Both pasture and tame hay conditions have improved from last week. Pasture conditions (tame hay conditions shown in brackets) are now rated as 3 (4)% poor, 50 (52)% fair, 43 (41)% good and 4 (3)% excellent.

-- For fall-seeded crops, conditions are reported as five% poor, 35% fair and 60% good.

Region Four: North West (Barrhead, Edmonton, Leduc, Drayton Valley, Athabasca)

-- Favorable warm and dry weather over the past week has allowed for a seeding progress of 35%, with now 36% of seeding completed.

-- About 51% of spring wheat, 18% of barley, 28% of canola, 77% of dry peas and 10% of potatoes are reported as seeded.

-- Although hay and pasture conditions have improved from a week ago, growth is still somewhat slow. Rainfall and warmer weather are needed to promote good growth. Pasture conditions (tame hay conditions shown in brackets) are rated as 3 (3)% poor, 53 (63)% fair and 44 (34)% good.

REGION FIVE: PEACE RIVER (FAIRVIEW, FALHER, GRANDE PRAIRIE, VALLEYVIEW)

-- While dry hot and windy days have facilitated seeding, the down side has been some diminished surface soil moisture reserves. Seeding for the Region is now 32% completed, compared to 1% from a week ago.

-- Almost 37% of spring wheat, 26% of barley, 29% of canola and 35% of dry peas have now been seeded.

-- Pasture and tame hay conditions are rated as 21% fair, 67% good and 12% excellent.


SASKATCHEWAN CROP REPORT

The following are highlights from the weekly crop report from Saskatchewan Agriculture, for the period May 8 to May 14. The report was released May 17.

Thanks to good seeding conditions, Saskatchewan producers made up the time lost in previous weeks. Thirty-five percent of the crop is now in the ground, just ahead of the five-year (2013-2017) seeding average of 32% for this time of year. Crops are starting to emerge.

Seeding is furthest advanced in the southeast, where 49% of the crop is in the ground. Forty-five percent is seeded in the southwest, 28% in the northeast, 26% in the west-central region and 24% in the east-central and northwestern regions.

Rain showers were reported throughout the province, particularly in the southwestern and west-central regions. The Gull Lake area received 18 mm of rain, the most in the province. There have been multiple reports of grass and stubble fires due to the dry conditions and rain would be welcomed to help alleviate dry field conditions and concerns.

Most areas need rain to help alleviate dry field conditions.

Thirty-three percent of the spring wheat, 26% of the canola, 57% of the lentils and 63% of the field peas have been seeded to date. Little rain, warm weather and strong and warm winds have caused topsoil moisture conditions to decline.

Hay and pasture growth is slow due to little rainfall.

Provincially, topsoil moisture conditions on cropland are rated as 57% adequate, 35% short and 8% very short. Hay land and pasture topsoil moisture is rated as 40% adequate, 43% short and 17% very short.

Producers are busy seeding, controlling weeds and moving cattle.

SaskPower reports 46 cases of farm machinery contacting electrical equipment in the last week, bringing the total for May to 73. Most farm-related incidents happen during seeding. SaskPower reminds producers to be aware of their surroundings at all times and to plan ahead. More safety information is available at www.saskpower.com/safety.

The following are the results by district:

SOUTHEASTERN SASKATCHEWAN (CROP DISTRICT 1 -- CARNDUFF, ESTEVAN, REDVERS, MOOSOMIN AND KIPLING AREAS; CROP DISTRICT 2 -- WEYBURN, MILESTONE, MOOSE JAW, REGINA AND QU'APPELLE AREAS; CROP DISTRICT 3ASE -- RADVILLE AND LAKE ALMA AREAS)

Producers in the southeastern region have made good seeding progress this week and 49% of the crop now in the ground. This is ahead of the five-year (2013-2017) seeding average of 39% for this time of year. Fifty-two percent of the wheat, 58% of the durum, 39% of the canola, 41% of the soybeans and 76% of the lentils have been seeded to date.

Although some areas received small amounts of rain, moisture is still needed to help replenish the topsoil. The Ceylon area received the most rain in the region -- 8 mm. Most other areas received between 0 and 5 mm of rain. The Moose Jaw, Regina and Ceylon areas have received the most precipitation (19 mm) in the region since April 1.

Topsoil moisture conditions have deteriorated over the past week, thanks to strong and warm winds. Rain will be needed in the coming weeks to help with crop germination and establishment. Cropland topsoil moisture is rated as 29% adequate, 51% short and 20% very short. Hay land and pasture topsoil moisture is rated as 13% adequate, 57% short and 30% very short. Hay and pasture is slow to grow and moisture is needed to help establish a hay crop. Crops are starting to emerge. Germination is uneven in some areas.

Farmers are busy seeding, moving cattle and controlling weeds, if necessary.

SOUTHWESTERN SASKATCHEWAN (CROP DISTRICT 3ASW -- CORONACH, ASSINIBOIA AND OGEMA AREAS; CROP DISTRICT 3AN -- GRAVELBOURG, MOSSBANK, MORTLACH AND CENTRAL BUTTE AREAS; CROP DISTRICT 3B -- KYLE, SWIFT CURRENT , SHAUNAVON AND PONTEIX AREAS; CROP DISTRICT 4 -- CONSUL, MAPLE CREEK AND LEADER AREAS)

Producers in the southeastern region have made good seeding progress this week and 49% of the crop now in the ground. This is ahead of the five-year (2013 to 2017) seeding average of 39% for this time of year. Fifty-two percent of the wheat, 58% of the durum, 39% of the canola, 41% of the soybeans and 76% of the lentils have been seeded to date.

Although some areas received small amounts of rain, moisture is still needed to help replenish the topsoil. The Ceylon area received the most rain in the region -- 8 mm. Most other areas received between zero and 5 mm of rain. The Moose Jaw, Regina and Ceylon areas have received the most precipitation (19 mm) in the region since April 1.

Topsoil moisture conditions have deteriorated over the past week, thanks to strong and warm winds. Rain will be needed in the coming weeks to help with crop germination and establishment. Cropland topsoil moisture is rated as 29% adequate, 51% short and 20% very short.

Hay land and pasture topsoil moisture is rated as 13% adequate, 57% short and 30% very short. Hay and pasture is slow to grow and moisture is needed to help establish a hay crop. Crops are starting to emerge. Germination is uneven in some areas.

Farmers are busy seeding, moving cattle and controlling weeds, if necessary.

EAST-CENTRAL SASKATCHEWAN (CROP DISTRICT 5 -- MELVILLE, YORKTON, CUPAR, KAMSACK, FOAM LAKE, PREECEVILLE AND KELVINGTON AREAS; CROP DISTRICT 6A -- LUMSDEN, CRAIK, WATROUS AND CLAVET AREAS)

Seeding operations are well underway in the region. Twenty-four percent of the crop is in the ground, slightly ahead of the five-year (2013 to 2017) seeding average of 19% for this time of year. Thirty percent of the wheat, 23% of the barley, 19% of the canola, 64% of the lentils and 61% of the peas have been seeded. Early seeded crops have emerged in good condition.

The majority of the region did not receive any rainfall last week. The Kenaston area received 3 mm and the Bulyea and Humboldt areas reported 2 mm. The Craik area has received the most precipitation (25 mm) in the region since April 1.

Producers have indicated that topsoil is drying out quickly and rain will be needed in the coming weeks for crops to germinate and emerge properly. Cropland topsoil moisture is rated as 56% adequate, 39% short and 5% very short. Hay land and pasture topsoil moisture is rated as 33% adequate, 52% short and 15% very short. Pastures are greening up, but are slow to grow due to the late spring.

Farmers are busy seeding, working fields, controlling weeds and fixing fences.

WEST-CENTRAL SASKATCHEWAN (CROP DISTRICTS 6B -- HANLEY, OUTLOOK, LOREBURN, SASKATOON AND ARELEE AREAS; CROP DISTRICT 7A -- ROSETOWN, KINDERSLEY, ESTON, MAJOR; CD 7B -- KERROBERT, MACKLIN, WILKIE AND BIGGAR AREAS)

A few minor rain showers resulted in small delays in seeding over the past week, but many farmers were happy to see some moisture. Twenty-six percent of the crop is in the ground in the region. The five-year (2013 to 2017) seeding average for this time of year is 30%. Twenty percent of the wheat, 31% of the durum, 60% of the peas and 26% of the canola and lentils have been seeded to date.

Many areas in the region reported receiving more than 10 mm of rain for the week. The Macklin area reported 17 mm, the Conquest and Langham areas 15 mm, the Harris area 10 mm, the Cando area 8 mm and the Kindersley area 6 mm. The Conquest area has received the most precipitation (28 mm) in the region since April 1.

Pastures have been slow to green up; however, the recent moisture will help alleviate the situation. Cropland topsoil moisture is rated as 74% adequate and 26% short. Hay land and pasture topsoil moisture is rated as 51% adequate, 44% short and 5% very short.

Farmers are busy seeding, controlling weeds, working fields and moving cattle.

NORTHEASTERN SASKATCHEWAN (CROP DISTRICT 8 -- HUDSON BAY, TISDALE, MELFORT, CARROT RIVER, HUMBOLDT, KINISTINO, CUDWORTH AND ABERDEEN AREAS; CROP DISTRICT 9AE -- PRINCE ALBERT, CHOICELAND AND PADDOCKWOOD AREAS)

Producers in the region made good seeding progress last week, thanks to warm weather. Twenty-eight percent of the crop is now in the ground, ahead of the five-year (2013 to 2017) seeding average of 15% for this time of year. Forty-five percent of the wheat, 24% of the oats, 20% of the barley and 18% of the canola have been seeded. Recent winds have dried up many wet fields and seeding conditions are good. Due to the dry spring, some producers are able to farm areas in fields that have been inaccessible in the last few years.

Little to no rainfall was reported in the region last week. The Nipawin area has received the most precipitation (27 mm) in the region since April 1.

Cropland topsoil moisture is rated as 71% adequate and 29% short. Hay land and pasture topsoil moisture is rated as 62% adequate and 38% short.

Pastures and hay land remain slow to green up, but the warmer weather has helped with growth. Some cattle producers continue to supplement their animals' feed.

Farmers are busy seeding, working fields and calving.

NORTHWESTERN SASKATCHEWAN (CROP DISTRICT 9AW -- SHELLBROOK, NORTH BATTLEFORD, BIG RIVER AND HAFFORD AREAS; CROP DISTRICT 9B -- MEADOW LAKE, TURTLEFORD, PIERCELAND, MAIDSTONE AND LLOYDMINSTER AREAS)

Seeding operations are in full swing in the region, and 24% of the crop is in the ground, just behind the five-year (2013 to 2017) seeding average of 28% for this time of year. Twenty-five percent of the wheat, 22% of the barley, 15% of the canola and 61% of the peas have been seeded.

Rain in the region ranged from nil to 15 mm (North Battleford area). The Speers area recorded 6 mm, the Neilburg area 9 mm and the Radisson area 5 mm. The North Battleford area has received the most precipitation (35 mm) in the region since April 1.

The majority of fields have adequate topsoil moisture, although some areas still remain short. Cropland topsoil moisture is rated as 76% adequate, 22% short and 2% very short. Hay land and pasture topsoil moisture is rated as 68% adequate, 25% short and 7% very short.

Many producers did not make a pre-seeding weed-control application due to slow weed growth. Weed control will be achieved through a pre-emergent or in-crop application. Pastures are starting to green up, although many producers are still feeding and waiting for better growing conditions for pastures.

Farmers are busy seeding and working fields.


ONTARIO CROP REPORT

The following are highlights from the Ontario Field Crop Report from Ontario Ministry of Agriculture, Food and Rural Affairs, released May 17.

Field activity continues in full gear as soils become fit for fieldwork. Many areas received some rainfall over the weekend, with areas of Kent and Essex catching heavier bands of rain that left over 100 mm in a few locations. As it happens every year, a few areas of the province have nearly completed planting, while areas with heavier soils wait for decent planting conditions to occur.

Fields that were planted to cover crops last fall -- both fall and spring terminated -- have required more tillage than fields without cover. A mat of residue kept soils wet and cold and delayed planting in those fields.

WHEAT

The winter wheat crop continues to advance (Zodak stage 30 to 37), although "tile-run" wheat is evident in areas with significant rainfall. Final nitrogen application, as well as herbicide and fungicide applications continue. To-date disease pressure remains low in Ontario with field scouts continuing to be on the lookout for stripe rust. Red clover seedlings have emerged.

SPRING CEREALS

The majority of the crop has been planted, and early planted fields have emerged uniformly. Many have been underseeded to forages. New seedings of forage acres and annual forage acres are expected to be increase to replace forages that were stressed during the dry season in 2016 and wet season in 2017.

FORAGES

Significant growth over the past week has many fields nearing bud stage. First cut will begin late in the week of May 26 for four-cut fields. Alfalfa weevil damage is starting to appear in some fields, although relative to other years very little damage is evident so far and weevil are still very small.

Corn

As of May 17 about 75% of the crop is in the ground, although there are areas of heavy soils where almost no corn has been planted. Corn planted at the beginning of May has started to emerge. Corn planted now is being planted into warm soils and emerging rapidly. Annual weed emergence continues to push for herbicide applications to match the stage of weed and corn growth.

SOYBEANS

Soybean planting is about 10 to 15% complete, although very few no-till beans have been planted to date.

CANOLA

Planting of canola continues in Bruce, Grey, Wellington, with estimates that 20% of intended acres will still be planted. Canola planted in early May is emerging now. Mid-May is probably the latest canola should be planted in order to avoid swede midge damage, and to avoid hot weather during flowering. Growers last year had good crops where they were planted into June, and may push the planting date later in northern regions.

Canola acreage is expected to be up in northern Ontario with fields in the Timmins area already planted and planting in the Temiskaming area is underway.

MANURE APPLICATION

Manure application continues ahead of corn planting to maximize nutrients. There has been increased interest in in-crop application. In a wet spring, it can be advantageous to plant corn and then apply manure into the standing crop as a side-dress application. Liquid manure with high ammonium N content is best suited for side-dress applications. Researchers in Ohio studied how long the drag hose can safely apply manure into an established standing crop before having a negative effect on corn population and yield. Study results to date indicate that V3 stage of corn -- 3-leaf collars is the safe limit for drag line application.

(ES/)

 
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